Here is a list of books i’m currently reading, have already read or plan to read. I try and read a mix of classics, potboilers, historical novels, etc. Book suggestions/comments are welcome.

Currently reading

  1. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon

So far in 2014:

  1. Psmith in the City by P. G. Wodehouse (3/5)

2014:

Best book: I, Claudius by Robert Graves
Worst book: Criminal: The Deluxe Edition, Volume One by ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips

The entire list for 2014 can be found here.

2013:

Best book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke
Worst book: Bury my heart at wounded knee by Dee Brown

The entire list for 2013 can be found here.

2012:

Embarrassed to say I dropped the ball in 2012 and forgot to write a post about the books I read. It was a very busy time for me at work.

2011:
Best book: Disgrace by J.  M. Coetzee
Worst book: Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

The entire list for 2011 can be found here.

2010:
Best book: Light in August by William Faulkner
Worst book: Second Degree — One Crazy Year at IIM-A by Prashant John

The entire list for 2010 can be found here.

2009:
Best book: Animal Farm by George Orwell
Worst book: The tailor’s daughter by Ben Antao

The entire list for 2009 can be found here.

2008:
Best book: Family matters by Rohinton Mistry
Worst book: Autumn of the Patriarch by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

The entire list for 2008 can be found here.

2007:
Best book: A fine balance by Rohinton Mistry
Worst book: False impression by Jeffrey Archer

The entire list for 2007 can be found here.

5 Responses to “Reading list”


  1. Great going! You read a lot! Came across your blog while doing a search for Ben Antao’s book…

  2. ipatrol Says:

    Thanks Frederick.

  3. Augusto Pinto Says:

    Frederick brought this blog to my attention. You certainly are a voracious reader [that’s an ability I have sadly lost in my old age] Also you picked up some great books to read . However I do not agree with some of your opinions Why are you so scared of Marquez for instance.

    How did you come across Ben Antao’s The Tailor’s Daughter? Unlike most of the books this one is not likely to be found in mainstream bookshops. About it you write
    “I found The tailor’s daughter remarkable not for its descriptions of casteism in India (which was poorly done) but rather for its vivid descriptions of intimate scenes, something that is rare in Goan books.”

    Actually from the standpoint of a Goan, I think The Tailor’s daughter is interesting because it vividly describes the mores of a specific group of Goan Catholics – the low and high caste Africanders, and upper caste Goans at a specific time in Goan history. For intimate scenes, I would suggest Fanny Hill or Madame Bovary .;-)

  4. ipatrol Says:

    Hello Augusto,

    How nice to have Goan visitors! Both your names sound vaguely familiar.

    > However I do not agree with some of your opinions Why are you so scared of Marquez for instance.
    Have you read Autumn of the Patriarch? It is an extremely obfuscated and inaccessible work.
    I’m not scared of Marquez. I just disliked one of his books, I read “A thousand years of solitude” and enjoyed it enormously.

    > How did you come across Ben Antao’s The Tailor’s Daughter?
    One of my relatives got it from her office library.

    > interesting because it vividly describes the mores of a specific group of Goan Catholics
    As I pointed out in my review the caste system was not described very well. I did not feel any anger at the bias the low-caste characters experienced.
    However, when I read the scenes describing caste injustice in “A fine balance” by Rohinton Mistry I was literally shaking with anger!

    > For intimate scenes, I would suggest Fanny Hill or Madame Bovary .;-)
    Ha ha. Let me clarify, I did not read the book for the intimate scenes. I simply found its vivid intimate scenes unusual for a Goan book.
    I’ll keep those suggestions in mind though, :).

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